2002-2003 Klopsteg Lecture Series

October 25

Trevor Pinch, Department of Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University
“In the Moog: The Early History of the Electronic Music Synthesizer”

November 15

John Krige, Dept. of History of Science and Technology, Georgia Tech
“The Politics of Philanthropy: The Rockerfeller Foundation’s Support for French Science in the early Cold War”

November 22

Roger Hart, Dept. of History, University of Texas-Austin
“The Disunity of Language, Science, and Culture”

December 6

James Schwoch, CICS and Dept. of Communication, Northwestern University
“’We should play the science fiction aspect with restraint’: Cold War Psychological Warfare, Global Public Opinion, and American Science Policy”

January 17

Charis Thompson, Department of History of Science, Harvard University
"The Biotech Mode of (Re)Production"

January 29

John Tresch, Department of History, Northwestern University
“The Dandy and the Demiurge: Individual, Technology, and Cosmos in Nineteenth Century France”

February 14

Shobita Parthasarathy, Dept. of Sociology, Northwestern University
"A Global Genome? Building Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer in the US and Britain"

February 28

Sandy Sufian, Dept. of Medical Humanities, University of Illinois-Chicago
"Malaria, Arab/Jewish relations and the Transformation of Palestine"

March 7

Peter Dear, Departments of History and Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University
"Natural Philosophy and the Ideology of Modern Science"

April 10

John Forrester, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, Cambridge University
“Freud and the scientists: on the early reception of psychoanalysis in England in the 1920s”

April 18

Peter Dear, Departments of History and Science and Technology Studies, Cornell University
"Natural Philosophy and the Ideology of Modern Science"

April 25

Martin Kenney, Department of Human and Community Development, University of California, San Diego
"A Tale of Two Universities: Entrepreneurship in the Departments of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley and Stanford"

May 9

Margaret Lock, Department of Anthropology, McGill University
“Savouring complexity and Resisting Hype: Alzheimer’s Disease, Molecular and Population Genetics”

May 19

Michael Adas, Professor of History, Rutgers University
“From Triumphalism to Contested Hegemony: World War II, the Cold War Standoff, and the Poverty of the Superpowers’ High Tech Development Alternatives for the Post-Colonial World”

May 23

Sharon Traweek, Department of History, University of California-Los Angeles

June 6

Carla Bittel, Department of History, Claremont-McKenna College