Former Graduate Students

Prior to 2009, graduate students admitted to SHC all entered through the History Department. Since then, the SHC program has expanded to welcome students through all the humanities and social science departments.

Catherine Clepper (RTVF/Screen Cultures)

Kellie Owens (Ph.D., Sociology, 2017). Fields: Science and Technology Studies; Sociology of Medicine; Gender Studies. Dissertation: Too Much of a Good Thing: Risk Perception and Practice Variation in Contemporary American Childbirth. Currently a Postdoctoral Fellow in Advanced Biomedical Ethics in the Department of Medical Ethics and Health Policy at the University of Pennsylvania.

Jessica Koski (Ph.D., Sociology, 2015). Fields: Science and technology studies; sociology of law; social movements. Dissertation: Human Rights and the Warming World: Knowing Change as a Socio-Legal Problem. Currently an Associate Organizing Representative on the Sierra Club's Beyond Coal Campaign in Seattle, WA.

Cassidy Puckett (Ph.D., Sociology, 2015).

Teri Chettiar (Ph.D., History, 2013). Fields: Modern Britain and the human sciences. Dissertation: "The Psychiatric Family: Citizenship, Private Life, and Emotional Health in Welfare-State Britain, 1945-1979." Currently in a three-year postdoctoral fellowship in the History of Knowledge at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science, Berlin.

Anne Koenig (Ph.D., History, 2013). Fields: Medieval Germany and medical/mental history. Dissertation: "Out of Their Minds: Madness, Medicine and Society in late Medieval Germany." Currently, a tenure-track assistant professor position in the History Department at South Florida University.

Stacy Lom (Ph.D., Sociology, 2013). Field: Sociology of medicine. Dissertation: "Sometimes Less Is More": The Development and Effects of Evaluative Cultures."

Rachel Plotnick (Ph.D., Media, Technology and Society, School of Communications, 2013). Field: History of technology and communication studies. Dissertation: "Signal and Switch: A Cultural History of the Push-Button Interface." Currently, a tenure-track Assistant Professor in the Communication Studies Department at the University of North Carolina, Charlotte.

Elizabeth Lenaghan (Ph.D., Media, Technology and Society, School of Communications, 2012). Field: Communication studies, history of technology. Dissertation: "Print Matters: Collecting Physical Books in a Digital Age." Currently a lecturer in the WCAS Writing Program, Northwestern University.

Bernard Geoghegan (Ph.D., Screen Cultures, School of Communication, 2012). Dissertation: "The Cybernetic Apparatus: Media, Liberalism, and the Reform of the Human Sciences." Currently in a three-year postdoctoral/Mitarbeiter fellowship at Humboldt University in Berlin.

Darcy Hughes Heuring (Ph.D., History, 2011). Field: Modern Britain and British Empire, history of medicine. Dissertation: "Health and the Politics of 'Improvement' in British Colonial Jamaica, 1914-1945." Currently the Earl S. Johnson Instructor in the Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences at the University of Chicago.

Genevieve Carlton (Ph.D., History, 2011). Field: Early Modern Italy, cartographic sciences. Dissertation: "Worldly Consumers: The Demand for Maps in Renaissance Italy." Currently Assistant Professor of History, University of Louisville.

William Cavert (Ph.D., History, 2011). Field: Early Modern Britain, environmental science. Dissertation: "Producing Pollution: Coal, Smoke, and Society in London 1550-1750." Currently an assistant professor in the History Department at the University of St. Thomas.

Lynn Gazley (Ph.D., Sociology, 2011). Field: Sociology of medicine. Currently Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology and Anthropology, College of New Jersey.

Meghan Roberts (Ph.D., History, 2011). Field: Eighteenth-Century France, history of science. Dissertation: "Cradle of the Enlightenment: Families and Knowledge-Making in Eighteenth-Century France." Currently Assistant Professor of History, Bowdoin College.

Andy Wehrman (Ph.D., History, 2011. Field: Early America, history of medicine. Dissertation: “The Contagion of Liberty: Medicine, Class, and Popular Politics in the American Revolution.” Currently Assistant Professor in History at Marietta College.

Elise Lipkowitz (Ph.D., History, 2009). Field: Modern French and British history of science. Currently Fellow of the American Association for the Advance of Science, attached to the National Science Foundation Board of Trustees.

Matthew Sterenberg (Ph.D., History, 2007). Field: Modern Britain, history of science. Dissertation: "The Waste Land, Middle Earth, and the Morris Mini: Mythic Thinking and Modernity in Twentieth-Century Britain." Currently Assistant Professor of European History in the School of International Liberal Studies, Waseda University, Japan.

Guy Ortolano (Ph.D. History, June 2005). Field: Modern British cultural history, history of science. Book based on dissertation: The Two-Cultures Controversy: Science, Literature, and Cultural Politics in Postwar Britain (Cambridge, 2009). Currently Associate Professor, Department of History, New York University.

Alison Pion (Ph.D. History, 2004). Field: Modern British social and medical history. Dissertation: “Progressive Thought and the Rhetoric of Reproduction in Late Victorian Britain.”

Christopher Tassava (Ph.D. History, 2003). Field: twentieth-century American technology. Dissertation: “Launching a Thousand Ships: Entrepreneurs, War Workers, and the State in American Shipbuilding, 1940-1945.” Currently Adjunct Professor, Department of History, Carleton College, Minnesota.

Karl Appuhn (Ph.D., History, 1999). Field: Early Modern Italy and environmental science. Book based on dissertation: A Forest on the Sea: Environmental Expertise in Renaissance Venice (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). Winner, Herbert Baxter Adams Prize, American Historical Association; Winner, Charles A. Weyerhaeuser Award, the Forest History Society. Currently Associate Professor, Department of History, New York University.

Dario Gaggio (Ph.D. History, 1999). Field: Modern European history of technology and society. Book based on dissertation: In Gold We Trust: Social Capital and Economic Change in the Italian Jewelry Towns (Princeton, 2007). Currently Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

Katherine Anderson (Ph.D., History, 1995). Field: Modern British history of science. Book based on dissertation: Predicting the Weather: Victorians and the Science of Meteorology (University of Chicago Press, 2005). Currently Associate Professor of History, York University, Ontario, Canada.

Rob Kieley (Ph.D. History, 1995). Field: Early modern European history of science. Dissertation title: “The Architect in the Alembic: Chemistry, Neoplatonism, and Religion in Seventeenth Century English Generation Theory.” Currently Assistant Professor of History, Illinois Mathematics and Science Academy.