Science in Human Culture at Northwestern University
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POST-DOCTORAL PROGRAM

 

Current Post-Doctoral Fellows

 

Mariana Craciun (Ph.D., Sociology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor)

SHC Post-doctoral Fellow, 2013-15 - Curriculum Vitae

mariana.craciun@northwestern.edu

Also affiliated with the Department of Sociology.

Mariana Craciun works at the intersection of the sociology of knowledge, social studies of science, and the sociology of medicine.  Her dissertation examined the psychotherapeutic practices by which psychoanalytic and “evidence-based” clinicians understand and treat mental and emotional problems.  Building on this project, and the extensive ethnographic observations and interviews that informed it, she is currently writing a book manuscript entitled Chasing Freud's dream: Psychotherapy between science and emotion.  The book captures the field of talk therapy in a transitional moment, torn between psychoanalytic approaches and the newer, cognitive and behavioral interventions.  She shows that these two orientations form intersecting epistemic cultures that are differentially valued in medical institutions and American culture more broadly.  Two other projects focus on knowledge and its role in making worth claims.  An article she is co-authoring with Jason Owen-Smith examines the role of scientists in science policy making, focusing specifically on embryonic stem cell research.  Another article, published in Ethnic and Racial Studies, details Romanian immigrants’ ambivalent relationship to Americanness, and their attempts at moral bricolage as they strategically use various racial and cultural elements to enhance their own moral worth. 

Mariana teaches two courses in the Department of Sociology and Science in Human Culture:  "Expert Knowledge and the Social World" (Winter) which examines constructions, contestations, and negotiations of expertise, and "Mental Health and Society" (Spring) focused on the history of psychiatry in the US, and trajectories of mental illness in Western and non-Western contexts.

Daniel Stolz (Ph.D., Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University)

SHC Post-doctoral Fellow, 2013-15 - Curriculum Vitae

daniel.stolz@northwestern.edu

Also affiliated with the Department of History.

Daniel Stolz works on the history of science in Islamic societies since the eighteenth century, with a focus on Egypt and the late Ottoman Empire. His current book project is a history of astronomy in nineteenth-century Egypt. The book weaves together the cultural history of new sites of astronomical knowledge, from state observatories to periodicals, with an examination of the continuity of Islamic traditions of astronomy. Other projects underway include a history of reading science in the Qur’an, and an article on mechanical timekeeping in eighteenth-century Egypt. Daniel has published on the relationship between important Islamic debates and broader conversations about science in the Arabic press in the early twentieth century. His article, “‘By virtue of your knowledge’: scientific materialism and the fatwas of Rashid Rida,” appeared in the Bulletin of the School of Oriental and African Studies in 2012.

Daniel teaches in the History Department. In Winter, 2015 he will offer “Islam, Science, and Modernity,” which will explore the long history of science in Islamic societies, from the ‘Abbasid translation movement to the late twentieth century, with special attention to the role that science has come to play in Muslim debates about modernity. In Spring, 2014 he will teach "Technology and Society in the Middle East since 1850," which will address transformations in the Middle East from the beginnings of the region's industrialization to the so-called "Facebook Revolutions" of 2009-2011.


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Science in Human Culture, 020 University Hall, 1897 Sheridan Rd., Evanston, IL 60208
tel: 847-491-3525 | fax: 847-467-2733
Director: Helen Tilley, University Hall, Room 025, shc-dir@northwestern.edu
Administrator: Natasha Dennison, University Hall, Room 020, shc-program@northwestern.edu