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Former Post-Doctoral Fellows

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Sokhieng Au

Sokhieng Au

2005-2007
Advisor: Ken Alder

Sokhieng Au (Ph.D., History-University of California, Berkeley) will be taking a position in 2019 as a continuing lecturer in the Global Health Studies Program at the University of Iowa. Since her postdoc at NU, she has served on the research faculty at the Catholic University in Leuven, Belgium; as a researcher and series editor for Médecins sans Frontières (MSF); and a research fellow at the Center for Khmer Studies in Cambodia. Au wrote Mixed Medicines: Health and Culture in French Colonial Cambodia.

Mariana Craciun

Mariana Craciun

2013-2015
Advisor: Steve Epstein

Mariana Craciun (Ph.D., Sociology, University of Michigan-Ann Arbor) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology at Tulane University.  Craciun's book project, started at Northwestern University, examines the production of knowledge in the field of mental health and is tentatively titled "Chasing Freud's Dream: Psychotherapy Between Science and Emotion".

Stefanie Graeter

Stefanie Graeter

2015-2017
Advisors: Mary Weismantel and Helen Tilley

Stefanie Graeter (M.A., Ph.D., Anthropology, University of California-Davis) will be taking up a tenure-track position at the University of Arizona in its Latin American Studies program in the fall of 2019. She was awarded a one-year postdoctoral fellowship to work with Kim Fortun at UC-Irvine and is advancing the publication of her book manuscript Mineral Incorporations, which analyzes the science, ethics, and politics of toxic exposure in Peru and the emergent potentials for making life within worlds of extractive capitalism. Graeter has published her research in Cultural Anthropology and E-misférica and links to her articles, interviews, forthcoming publications, photo and video work can be found on her website

Anthony Hazard

Anthony Hazard

2007-2009
Advisor: Ken Alder

Anthony Hazard (Ph.D., History, Temple) is a tenured Assistant Professor in the Ethnic Studies department with a courtesy appointment in the History department at Santa Clara University. Hazard's book, launched during his postdoctoral years at Northwestern is entitled, Postwar Anti-Racism: The United States, UNESCO, and "Race," 1945-1968, was published by Palgrave in 2012.

Hi'ilei Julia Hobart

Hi'ilei Julia Hobart

2016-2018
Advisor: Helen Tilley

Julia Hobart (M.A., Ph.D., Food Studies, New York University), is a Postdoctoral Fellow in Native Studies at Columbia University Center for the Study of Ethnicity and Race. Her research is broadly concerned with Indigenous foodways, Pacific Island studies, settler colonialism, urban infrastructure, and the performance of taste. Hobart is interested in how personal and political investments in coldness facilitate particular ideas about race, belonging, comfort and leisure in the Pacific.

David Hoyt

David Hoyt

1999-2000
Advisor: David Joravsky

David Hoyt (Ph.D., History, UCLA) is an independent scholar and writer in the Chicago area.

Diana Kurkovsky West

Diana Kurkovsky West

2017-2019
Advisors: John Bushnell and Helen Tilley

Diana Kurkovsky West (Ph.D., History and Theory of Architecture, Princeton University) is an instructor in History at Alburn University. Her research is focused on the study of the social impact of technologies, with a particular interest in social history of data and information. She is completing a book manuscript titled CyberSovietica: Dreaming of Big Data in the Soviet Union, which contends that Soviet planners were the first to imagine a "smart" country of its kind.

Ayval Ramati Leshem

Ayval Ramati Leshem

1994-1995
Advisor: David Jarovsky

Ayval Ramati Leshem (Ph.D., History, UCLA) Her book Newton on Mathematics and Spiritual Purity (Kluwer, 2003) is based upon her research as a postdoctoral fellow.

Fredrik Meiton

Fredrik Meiton

2015-2017
Advisor: Ken Alder

Fredrik Meiton (Ph.D., History, New York University) is an Assistant Professor of world history at the Univeristy of New Hampshire. He's a historian of the Modern Middle East and studies the intersection of politics, science and the environment, especially in the context of colonial delvelopment. He teaches courses in the global history of science and technology with a focus on the politics of energy. Meiton wrote Electrical Palestine: Capital and Technology from Empire to Nation based upon his research as a postdoctoral fellow.

Tania Munz

Tania Munz

2010-2012
Advisor: Ken Alder

Tania Munz (Ph.D., History of Science, Princeton) is the Vice President for Scholarly Programs at the National Humanities Center in North Carolina, where she oversees the fellowship program and advocates on behalf of the humanities. Her work focuses on the history of the life sciences. At Northwestern Munz  served as a college advisor and also worked on her book, The Dancing Bees: Karl von Frisch and the Discovery of the Honeybee Dance Language, which was published in 2016 by the University of Chicago Press and was awarded the Davis Prize from the History of Science Society. Previously, she was the Vice President for Research and Scholarship at the Linda Hall Library in Kansas City.

Onur Özgöde

Onur Özgöde

2017-2019
Advisor: Bruce Carruthers

Onur Özgöde (Ph.D., Sociology, Columbia University) is a visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology for 2019-2020. He's an economic sociologist whose work explores the emergence and governance of socio-economic problems that exceed the limits of political liberalism. While a postdoc fellow, Özgöde worked on a book manuscript entitled "Fractals of Governance: Governing Systemic Risk at the Limits of Neoliberalism, 1922-2010" that has recently received an advance publishing contract from the STS series at MIT Press. He also taught two courses, "Sociology of Expertise: Experts & Society" and "Economists and the Construction of the Economy".

Lindsay Smith

Lindsay Smith

2008-2010
Advisor: Ken Alder

Lindsay Smith (Ph.D., Anthropology, Harvard) is an Assistant Professor in the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at Arizona State University.  She was formerly in the Department of Geography and Environmental Studies at the University of New Mexico Albuquerque. In 2010-12 she was a postdoctoral fellow at the Society and Genetics Program at UCLA. She then completed a fellowship at the American Association for the Advance of Science in Washington, D.C.. Smith's book Subversive Genes: Re(con)stituting Identity, Family and Human Rights in Argentina, was published by Harvard University in 2008.

Laura Stark

Laura Stark

2006-2008
Advisor: Chas Camic

Laura Stark (Ph.D., Sociology, Princeton) is an Associate Professor in the Center for Medicine, Health, and Society at Vanderbilt University. Stark's book, Behind Closed Doors: IRBs and the Making of Ethical Research, is based on her postdoctoral research and was published in 2011 by the University of Chicago Press.

Daniel Stolz

Daniel Stolz

2013-2015
Advisors: Helen Tilley and Ken Alder

Daniel Stoltz (Ph.D., Near Eastern Studies, Princeton University) is an Assistant Professor of History at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. A historian of the modern Middle East, he specializes in Egypt and the late Ottoman Empire and his research interests include the history of science, technology, Islam, and public finance. His first book, The Lighthouse and the Observatory: Islam, Science, and Empire in Late Ottoman Egypt (Cambridge University Press, 2018) shows how new institutions of astronomy shaped the modern Egyptian state as well as the emergence of new forms of Islamic piety in the early twentieth century. Stoltz's current research project, Middle East Public Debt and Global Financial Knowledge, investigates the consequences of the Ottoman and Egyptian public defaults of the late nineteenth century, situating the Middle East within a global history of the rise of public debt and the forms of political and financial knowledge on which it depended. After the completion of his postdoctoal fellowship he was a visiting professor in the History Department of Northwestern University 2015-2018.

John Tresch

John Tresch

2002-2004
Advisor: Ken Alder

John Tresch (Ph.D., History and Philosophy of Science, Cambridge) is a Mellon Professor in Art History, History of Science and Folk Practice in the Warburg Institute at the University of London, United Kingdom. Tresch's book was written during his postdoctoral fellowship The Romantic Machine: Science and Utopian Technology in France from 1820 to 1851 and was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2012, winning the Pfizer Prize from the History of Science Society.

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